Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Pines
drypoint-4th state
6 x 4
.5

This is one of my drypoint efforts this past week, mostly just experimental to learn about making marks on the plate and how inking the plate in certain ways could result in different effects. I printed the plate a number of times and reworked it with the needle as well as varying the way I inked and wiped the plate.

I like the tonal qualities you can get by leaving some ink on the plate rather than just in the lines. Also, as I mentioned before, drypoint makes a more painterly line than etching because its composed of the line itself plus the burr that is made from the needle plowing through the plate. The ink actually catches in that burr, so it produces a less linear result when printed. I like that.



11 comments:

Stinson Fine Art said...

Looks Great Deborah!

loriann said...

The feel of it is moody, quiet, like your paintings. A beauty.

RUDHI - Chance said...

Like it! Drypoint too, and should try again; the cleaning of the plate from ink before printing is the A&O of Drypint I think; your sunset values are dawnful...

RUDHI - Chance said...

Is your plate Tin, Aluminium, plastic or copper, please?

Caroline said...

Amazing it is your style of work transported into another working medium. Feels like looking into something from the past, another age. Lovely work Deborah I am wondering how long it is taking to create.

Deborah Paris said...

Thank you John and Loriann. I am having fun with it!

Hello Rudhi. The plate is zinc.

Hi Caroline. Thank you!. The initial work on the plate took a couple of hours but I've tweaked it quite a bit since then. It takes me about a half hour to ink one up but I think that's just because I'm new to the whole thing.

Ken said...

wonderful!!

Deborah Paris said...

Thanks Ken! I appreciate that coming from a real printmaker! I've enjoyed visiting your website and blog.

Brian McGurgan said...

This looks wonderful, Deborah - what paper are you printing on? I've been reading a lot in recent months about Whistler's stay in Venice where he developed a distinctive style and approach with both his pastels and etchings. In his etching he experimented with leaving gradations of ink on the plate to create tone in the manner you described in your post. Looking forward to seeing where you go with your drypoint!

Leslie Sealey said...

This is just lovely! I really like the mood and atmosphere in all of your work.

Deborah Paris said...

Thank you Leslie.